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Snowmobiling Hand Signals

 

Snowmobiling

Snowmobiling Hand Signals

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Hand Signals
Compliments of snowmobilers.org
 

Giving clear, easy-to-see hand signals are vital to safe snowmobile riding. Be sure to never make hand signals subtle, always make deliberate signals. Be sure that the drivers behind you can see any signal you make. Hand signals are a very reliable way to communicate while riding.

Stop: Arm raised from the shoulder and extended
straight up over the head with palm of hand flat.
Left Turn: Left arm extended straight out from the shoulder and pointing in the direction of the turn.
Right Turn: Bend your left arm at the elbow to shoulder height; with your hand pointing straight up and your palm flat, your arm should make a right angle
Oncoming Sleds: Guide your snowmobile to the right while pointing to the trail over your head, so your signal can be seen.
Slowing: Left arm extended out and down from the side of the bodywith a downward flapping motion of hand to signal warning or caution
Sleds Following: Arm raised, elbow bent with thumb pointing backward, in hitchhiking motion move arm forward to backward over your shoulder.

Last Sled in Line: Left arm raised at shoulder height, elbow bent and forearm vertical with